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Toxicity of a binary mixture on Daphnia Magna: study of the biological effects of uranium and selenium, individually and in a mixture

Florence ZEMAN, doctorate of University Montpellier II, 210 p., defended on the 30th october 2008

Document type > *Mémoire/HDR/Thesis

Keywords > uranium, international standard problem (ISP), B4C Oxidation, interference

Research Unit > IRSN/DEI/SECRE/LRE

Authors > ZEMAN Florence

Publication Date > 30/10/2008

Summary

Among the multiple substances that affect freshwaters ecosystems, uranium and selenium are two pollutants found worldwide in the environment, alone and in mixture. The aim of this thesis work was to investigate the effect of uranium and selenium mixture on daphnid (Daphnia magna). Studying effects of a mixture requires the assessment of the effect of single substances. Thus, the first experiments were performed on single substance. Acute toxicity data were obtained: EC50 48h = 0,39±0,04 mg.L-1 for uranium and EC50 48h = 1,86±0,85mg.L-1 for selenium. Chronic effects were also studied. Data on fecundity showed an EC10 reproduction of 14±7μg. L-1 for uranium and of 215±25μg. L-1 for selenium. Uranium-selenium mixture toxicity experiments were performed and revealed an antagonistic effect. This study further demonstrates the importance of taking into consideration different elements in binary mixture studies such as the choice of reference models (concentration addition or independent action), statistical method, time exposure and endpoints. Using integrated parameters like energy budget was shown to be an interesting way to better understand interactions. An approach including calculation of chemical speciation in the medium and bioaccumulation measurements in the organism permits assumptions to be made on the nature of possible interactions between mixture components (toxico-dynamic et toxico-kinetic interactions).

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Catherine Pradines, thesis supervisor

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Thesis report


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