SharePoint
Aide
IRSN, Institut de radioprotection et de sûreté nucléaire

Search our site :

ok

Contact us :

ok
En Fr

Enhancing Nuclear Safety


Research

Publications

Estimation of marine source-term following Fukushima Dai-ichi accident

​Journal of Environmental Radioactivity / Volume 114, Pages 2-9, December 2012

Summary

​​Contamination of the marine environment following the accident in the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant represented the most important artificial radioactive release flux into the sea ever known. The radioactive marine pollution came from atmospheric fallout onto the ocean, direct release of contaminated water from the plant and transport of radioactive pollution from leaching through contaminated soil. In the immediate vicinity of the plant (less than 500 m), the seawater concentrations reached 68 000 Bq.L−1 for 134Cs and 137Cs, and exceeded 100 000 Bq.L−1 for 131I in early April. Due to the accidental context of the releases, it is difficult to estimate the total amount of radionuclides introduced into seawater from data obtained in the plant. An evaluation is proposed here, based on measurements performed in seawater for monitoring purposes. Quantities of 137Cs in seawater in a 50-km area around the plant were calculated from interpolation of seawater measurements. The environmental halftime of seawater in this area is deduced from the time-evolution of these quantities. This halftime appeared constant at about 7 days for 137Cs. These data allowed estimation of the amount of principal marine inputs and their evolution in time: a total of 27 PBq (12 PBq–41 PBq) of 137Cs was estimated up to July 18. Even though this main release may be followed by residual inputs from the plant, river runoff and leakage from deposited sediments, it represents the principal source-term that must be accounted for future studies of the consequences of the accident on marine systems. The 137Cs from Fukushima will remain detectable for several years throughout the North Pacific, and 137Cs/134Cs ratio will be a tracer for future studies.


Close

Send to a friend

The information you provide in this page are single use only and will not be saved.
* Required fields

Recipient's email:*  

Sign with your name:* 

Type your email address:*   

Add a message :

Do you want to receive a copy of this email?

Send

Cancel

Close

WP_IMPRIMER_TITLE

WP_IMPRIMER_MESSAGE

Back

Ok